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Vegetable Scrap Stock 3 Ways (Stovetop, Crockpot, Sousvide)

Vegetable Scrap Stock 3 Ways (Stovetop, Crockpot, Sousvide)

As much as I hate to admit it, winter is coming. While I really dislike the cold, there are a few things I do enjoy about winter. One of them is getting cozy inside with a warm cup of soup while winter is raging outside the windows. Having vegetable stock in my freezer for the winter months is therefore an absolute must. It makes making soup super quick and easy. It also allows me to give other recipes like sauces and stews a nutritional boost. And finally, as the name vegetable scrap stock implies, it uses up things I would normally throw away and is therefore completely free to make. What is there not to love?!

 

Health Benefits of Vegetable Stock

Vegetable stock is rich in important minerals and a great way to boost your immune system during the winter months. If you feel like you are getting a cold, heat yourself up a bowl and drink it as if it were tea. Or cook it into soup. It is a perfect winter all-rounder to have on hand.

Depending on what you put in your stock the nutritional content may vary, but either way it will be healthy and delicious! Additionally, it can also help with weight-loss due to its low calorie content. For instance, by drinking a cup of vegetable stock before a meal, you end up eating less.

Store-bought vegetable stock is often very high in sodium and lacks flavor. Making it yourself is a great way to control both the sodium and the flavors. You can make it exactly to your taste and liking. It is also a great way to use up overdue vegetables in your fridge.

Learn to make nutritional and delicious vegetable scrap stock yourself from kitchen scraps. 3 different methods (stovetop, crockpot, sousvide).

What Goes Into Vegetable Scrap Stock

Basic ingredients

Every vegetable stock should contain 3 basic ingredients: onions, celery and carrots.

These should form the basis of your stock. If you don’t cook with these often, you can also buy some extra to make sure you have the basis covered. In theory, this is enough to make your stock, you don’t have to add anything else. But that wouldn’t be any fun, would it? 😛

basic ingredients of a vegetable stock

 

Additions

As far as add-ins go, the possibilities are nearly endless. You can add veggies such as bell peppers, zucchini, herbs and stalks, leeks, garlic, potatoes, corn cobs etc. The trick is to get creative and to play with the flavors until you find a stock you really enjoy. The worst that can happen is that your stock gets bitter or discolored.

To save you the trouble, here is a list of things to avoid: 

  • Beets
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumber
  • Lettuce
  • Turnips
  • Okra

As you can see, those are basically vegetables that contain a lot of water or have a very strong flavor or color when boiled.

Printable cheat sheet and recipe

If your unsure on what vegetables to use or you want a quick and easy cheat sheet to hang on your fridge: Download my Scrap Stock Recipe + Cheat Sheet. It contains a list of veggies to put in and which ones to avoid as well as a printable recipe for each way of making the scrap stock.

Learn to make nutritional and delicious vegetable scrap stock yourself from kitchen scraps. 3 different methods (stovetop, crockpot, sousvide).

What vegetable parts to use & how to store them

Generally, you can use any part of a vegetable, that includes leaves, ends, tops, peels or stalks. Just make sure you wash the veggies. Also, stay away from moldy vegetables! The vegetables can easily be overripe or mushy but they shouldn’t be spoiled. If you wouldn’t let anyone eat it, don’t put it in your vegetable scrap stock!

What I do is put a freezer safe container or ziplock bag in the freezer and put all my vegetable scraps for stock into the bag when I am cooking. When the bag is full, I make stock. Simple as 1, 2, 3. The vegetable scraps can stay in the freezer for up to 6 months so there is no need to hurry.

Turning vegetable scrap stock into bone broth:

If you want to, you can also add bones to this stock and make it a bone broth. Bones add collagen and gelatin to the stock and make it more filling due to the added fat content. I would recommend using beef, chicken or turkey bones (or a mix of these).

Simply collect the bones from when you cook meat or buy them from a butcher. You can store the bones in the freezer until you are ready to make the broth. Just add the bones with the vegetables and proceed as usual. Be aware that the gelatin in the bones will thicken your broth and make it gel as it cools. That is perfectly normal.

 

Learn to make nutritional and delicious vegetable scrap stock yourself from kitchen scraps. 3 different methods (stovetop, crockpot, sousvide).

The Best Way to Make Vegetable Scrap Stock

Making your own vegetable scrap stock using kitchen scraps you would normally throw out is super easy and you don’t need to have any fancy equipment or kitchen gadgets (but if you do, I got you covered as well ;)). I have personally tried and tested three different ways of making it, which I am sharing with you below. Because I am using vegetable scraps, my stock will never be the same twice. But I do tend to stick to the same basic recipe:

Ingredients:

  • Full container or bag of vegetable scraps
  • Enough water to cover the scraps
  • A few clothes of garlic (if not already in the scraps)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • A couple of sprigs of herbs (parsley, thyme, rosemary etc.)
  • Optional: Salt to taste

 

The Traditional Method: Stovetop

This method requires no special equipment other than a stockpot large enough to hold your vegetables. I would recommend doing this while you are home for the day, since you do have to leave your stove on for 10-12 hours.

  1. Put all the ingredients (except salt) into a large stockpot, fill with water until just covered.
  2. Bring to a boil, then reduce the stock to a simmer. Cover and let it simmer for 10-12 hours on low, stirring occasionally.
  3. Strain the vegetables out of the stock and discard.
  4. Taste the stock, if not flavorful enough you can continue to simmer it to intensify the taste.
  5. Salt to taste and allow to cool.
  6. Either refrigerate stock for up to 5 days or freeze it. Put into ice cube trays for easier portioning.

 

The Hands-Off Method: Crockpot

This method is probably my favorite since it is pretty much hands-off and foolproof. Unfortunately, I don’t own a crockpot anymore, but am hoping to get one again in the future.

  1. Put all the ingredients into your crockpot. Fill with water until just covered.
  2. Set your crockpot on low and leave it cooking for 24 hours.
  3. Strain the vegetables out of the stock and discard.
  4. Taste the stock, if not flavorful enough, turn the crockpot on high and simmer with the lid off to intensify the taste.
  5. Salt to taste and allow to cool.
  6. Either refrigerate stock for up to 5 days or freeze it. Put into ice cube trays for easier portioning.

 

The Modern Method: Sous Vide

  1. Heat your sous vide to 187°F/86°C.
  2. There are two ways you can do this:
    1. Put all the ingredients in a zip lock bag, fill it up with water until they are covered. Submerge the bag in the sousvide water bath until the liquid reaches the top, seal it.
    2. Or put all the ingredients in a vacuum bag, fill with water and submerge it in the water bath. Fold the top of the bag over a couple of times to seal it and clip it shut using paper/binder clips.
  3. Sousvide the stock for 12 hours.
  4. Strain the vegetables out of the stock and discard.
  5. Taste the stock, if not flavorful enough, transfer it to a pot and reduce it to intensify the taste.
  6. Salt to taste and allow to cool.
  7. Either refrigerate stock for up to 5 days or freeze it. Put into ice cube trays for easier portioning.

 

Like this post? Remember to pin it!

Learn to make nutritional and delicious vegetable scrap stock yourself from kitchen scraps. 3 different methods (stovetop, crockpot, sousvide).

 

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This post was shared on: Homestead Blog Hop



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7 Comments on "Vegetable Scrap Stock 3 Ways (Stovetop, Crockpot, Sousvide)"

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Deborah
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Hi Laura,
I hopped by from the Homestead Blog Hop to read your Vegetable Scrap Stock post. I hate to waste vegetable scraps so I love to make stocks and also add some scraps to smoothies or create blended dressings or soups from clean, organic scraps. I am pinning and sharing your post.

Andrea Lynch
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Great post! I need to do this! I’m an avid canner and now that the gardening season is coming to an end, I’m looking for something to put in the pantry….veggie scrap broth is a great idea!

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Marla
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Hi Laura,
Great post! Bone broth is one of the most nutritious foods. I love how it laid out the details of how to make and what not to put in .Congratulations on being featured on Homestead blog hop. Pinned! Have a healthy, happy & blessed day!

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